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The January 4 Tokyo Dome Show is a major show, held by New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW), held annually on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome. NJPW often invites other promotions, Japanese and international, to participate in their January 4 Tokyo Dome Shows as well including several companies that have been involved in scripted inter-promotional rivalries such as UWF International (UWFi), Big Japan Pro Wrestling (BJW), All Japan Pro Wrestling (AJPW), Pro Wrestling ZERO1 and Pro Wrestling NOAH, as well as representatives from the Mexican Consejo Mundial de Lucha Libre (CMLL) promotion. The shows have regularly featured wrestlers from American promotions such as World Championship Wrestling (WCW) and Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (TNA) and has on these occasions been shown either partially or in full in the American market.

It has become an annual event that starts the new year in NJPW since its inception in 1992. NJPW have held shows at the Tokyo Dome as far back as April 24, 1989, but their January 4 show has become the most anticipated show on NJPW calendar. It is Japan's biggest wrestling event and NJPW's premier show, similar to what the WrestleMania is for the WWE. The first two January 4 Tokyo Dome Shows were also the last two WCW/New Japan Supershows. Since 2007, when the event was renamed "Wrestle Kingdom in Tokyo Dome", the Dome shows have been broadcast on pay-per-view (PPV). As of 2016 all the Dome shows have featured championship matches, including several titles not owned by NJPW. On three occasions (1998, 2006 and 2013), no titles changed hands during the show. The 1993 Tokyo Dome show set the attendance record with 63,500 fans packing the Tokyo Dome, while the 2007 Dome show drew the lowest gates with only 18,000 in attendance. As of 2016, the January 4 shows have hosted 272 matches (not including dark matches), 86 of which were title matches leading to 38 title changes in total. The 2005 Tokyo Dome show had a 16 match card, the largest of any of the shows, while 2001, 2002, 2007, 2013 and 2016 featured 9 matches, the lowest number of matches on a show.

Super Warriors in Tokyo DomeEdit

Super Warriors in Tokyo Dome
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 1992[1]
Attendance 50,000[1]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

First Super Warriors in Tokyo Dome Fantastic Story in Tokyo Dome

The first ever January 4 Tokyo Dome show held by New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW) was called Super Warriors in Tokyo Dome and would start the tradition of NJPW holding their biggest show of the year on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome, making it their Super Bowl or WrestleMania event. It was promoted in conjunction with the American-based World Championship Wrestling (WCW). The show featured a mixture of NJPW and WCW wrestlers facing each other, with most of the matches that included WCW wrestlers being shown in North America as a PPV under the name WCW/New Japan Supershow II. The show drew 50,000 spectators for a gate of the equivalent of $3,700,000 at the exchange rate at the time.[1] The show featured 12 matches, including two dark matches, matches held before the PPV broadcast began. Six of the twelve bouts featured wrestlers from WCW. On the show Lex Luger successfully defended his WCW World Heavyweight Championship against Masahiro Chono, while the main event saw Riki Choshu defeated Tatsumi Fujinami. The match unified the Greatest 18 Club Championship and the IWGP Heavyweight Championship. Japanese heavy metal band Show-Ya performed live music between matches and performed theme music for a match where The Great Muta and Sting wrestled The Steiner Brothers.

# Results Stipulations Times
1D Black Cat defeated Hiroyoshi Yamamoto Singles Match 10:28
2D Osamu Kido and Kuniaki Kobayashi defeated Kantaro Hoshino and Kengo Kimura Tag team match 11:54
3 Akira Nogami, Masashi Aoyagi and Jushin Thunder Liger defeated Norio HonagaHiro Saito and Super Strong Machine Six-man tag team match 15:12
4 Arn Anderson and Larry Zbyszko defeated Shiro Koshinaka and Michiyoshi Ohara Tag team match 12:32
5 Dustin Rhodes and Dusty Rhodes defeated Kim Duk and Masa Saito Tag team match 14:23
6 Tony Halme defeated Scott Norton Singles Match 08:41
7 Shinya Hashimoto defeated Bill Kazmaier Singles Match 08:37
8 Big Van Vader vs. El Gigante ended in a double disqualification Singles Match 04:49
9 Antonio Inoki defeated Hiroshi Hase Singles Match 10:09
10 The Great Muta and Sting defeated The Steiner Brothers (Rick Steiner and Scott Steiner) Tag team match 11:03
11 Lex Luger (c) defeated Masahiro Chono Singles match for the WCW World Heavyweight Championship 15:09
12 Riki Choshu (c) defeated Tatsumi Fujinami (c) Singles match for both the The Greatest 18 Club Championship (Choshu) and the IWGP Heavyweight Championship (Fujinami) 12:11

Fantastic Story in Tokyo DomeEdit

Fantastic Story in Tokyo Dome
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 1993[2]
Attendance 63,500[2]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Super Warriors in Tokyo Dome Fantastic Story in Tokyo Dome Battlefield

Fantastic Story in Tokyo Dome was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that takes place on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome. The show drew 63,500 spectators and $3,200,000 in ticket sales.[2] This was the second year that the show was co-promoted by the American World Championship Wrestling (WCW) promotion. The show was later shown on pay-per-view (PPV) in North America as WCW/New Japan Supershow III. The show featured 10 matches, including four matches that featured WCW wrestlers. Fantastic Story featured three title matches, including Jushin Thunder Liger defeating Último Dragón to win the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship. IWGP Heavyweight Champion The Great Muta defeating Masahiro Chono to win the NWA World Heavyweight Championship in a match where the IWGP title was also on the line. Finally the show featured an IWGP Tag Team Championship match between The Hell Raisers (Hawk Warrior and Power Warrior) and The Steiner Brothers (Rick and Scott) that ended without a definitive winner.

# Results Stipulations Times
1 Takayuki IizukaAkira Nogami and El Samurai defeated Nobukazu Hirai, Koki Kitahara and Masao Orihara Six-man tag team match 15:11
2 Akitoshi SaitoThe Great Kabuki, Masashi Aoyagi and Shiro Koshinaka defeated Hiro SaitoNorio Honaga and Super Strong Machine and Tatsutoshi Goto Eight-man tag team match 14:20
3 Jushin Thunder Liger defeated Último Dragón (c) Singles Match for the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship. 20:09
4 Ron Simmons defeated Tony Halme Singles Match 06:10
5 Sting defeated Hiroshi Hase Singles Match 15:31
6 Masa Saito and Shinya Hashimoto defeated Dustin Rhodes and Scott Norton Tag team match 13:57
7 The Great Muta (c) defeated Masahiro Chono (c) Singles match for both the IWGP Heavyweight Championship (Muta) and the NWA World Heavyweight Championship (Chono) 19:48
8 The Hell Raisers (Hawk Warrior and Power Warrior) (c) wrestled The Steiner Brothers (Rick Steiner and Scott Steiner) to a double countout Tag team match for the IWGP Tag Team Championship 14:38
9 Tatsumi Fujinami defeated Takashi Ishikawa Singles Match 11:41
10 Genichiro Tenryu defeated Riki Choshu Singles Match 18:14

BattlefieldEdit

Battlefield
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 1994[3]
Attendance 48,000[3]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Fantastic Story in Tokyo Dome Battlefield Battle 7

Battlefield was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that takes place on January 4 each year in the Tokyo Dome. The show drew 48,000 spectators. Unlike the previous two years events the 1994 show was not billed as being co-promoted by World Championship Wrestling (WCW) although it did feature former WCW wrestlers The Steiner Brothers (Rick and Scott), who were working for WCW's rival, World Wrestling Federation (WWF), at the time. The show also featured Brutus Beefcake and Hulk Hogan before they began working with WCW, working freelance for NJPW for one night.

The show featured 11 matches in total, including two title matches that saw The Hell Raisers (Hawk and Power Warrior) defeat The Jurassic Powers (Hercules Hernandez and Scott Norton) to win the IWGP Tag Team Championship while Shinya Hashimoto successfully defended the IWGP Heavyweight Championship against Masahiro Chono. The show also featured a Mask vs. Mask match where Tiger Mask was unmasked and revealed as Koji Kanemoto. It would be several years before a new Tiger Mask, the fourth Tiger Mask began using the ring persona and not until after the turn of the millennia that the Tiger Mask character would appear in NJPW.

# Results Stipulations Times
1 The Great KabukiKengo KimuraKuniaki KobayashiMichiyoshi Ohara and Shiro Koshinaka defeated El Samurai, Manabu NakanishiOsamu KidoSatoshi Kojima and Yuji Nagata Ten-man tag team match 12:09
2 Akira Nogami and Takayuki Iizuka defeated Akitoshi Saito and Masashi Aoyagi Tag team match 14:07
3 Brutus Beefcake defeated Black Cat Singles Match 08:06
4 Super Strong Machine defeated Tatsutoshi Goto Singles Match 08:51
5 Jushin Thunder Liger defeated Tiger Mask Mask vs. Mask match 14:26
6 The Hell Raisers (Hawk and Power Warrior) defeated The Jurassic Powers (Hercules Hernandez and Scott Norton) (c) Tag team match for the IWGP Tag Team Championship 12:47
7 The Steiner Brothers (Rick Steiner and Scott Steiner) defeated Hiroshi Hase and Keiji Mutoh Tag team match 20:51
8 Hulk Hogan defeated Tatsumi Fujinami Singles Match 13:33
9 Riki Choshu defeated Yoshiaki Fujiwara Singles Match 09:04
10 Shinya Hashimoto (c) defeated Masahiro Chono Singles match for the IWGP Heavyweight Championship 28:00
11 Genichiro Tenryu defeated Antonio Inoki Singles match 15:56

Battle 7Edit

Battle 7
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 1995[4]
Attendance 52,500[4]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Battlefield Battle 7 Pyongyang International Sports and Culture Festival for Peace
{{{event}}} chronology

Battlefield Battle 7 Wrestling World 1996

Battle 7 was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that traditionally takes place on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome. Battle 7 was the fourth January 4 Tokyo Dome Show held by NJPW. The show drew 52,500 spectators and $4,800,000 in ticket sales.[4] Besides NJPW Wrestlers the show also featured Sting from World Championship Wrestling and former WCW stars The Steiner Brothers (Rick and Scott) as well as freelance wrestlers Tiger Jeet Singh and Tiger Jeet Singh, Jr.. The show featured a four-man "Final Countdown BVD" tournament, named after NJPW sponsor BVD. The 1995 show marked the first time a non-NJPW title was defended as Shinjiro Otani defended the UWA World Welterweight Championship (originated in the Universal Wrestling Association in Mexico) against El Samurai.

Match results
# Results Stipulations Times
1 Shinjiro Otani (c) defeated El Samurai Singles match for the UWA World Welterweight Championship 15:17
2 Norio Honaga (c) defeated The Great Sasuke Singles match for the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship 14:39
3 Akitoshi Saito, The Great Kabuki and Kuniaki Kobayashi defeated Akira Nogami, Osamu Kido and Takayuki Iizuka Six-man tag team match 13:12
4 Koji Kanemoto defeated Yuji Nagata Singles match 14:43
5 Hiroyoshi Tenzan defeated Manabu Nakanishi Singles match 07:40
6 Tiger Jeet Singh and Tiger Jeet Singh, Jr. defeated Michiyoshi Ohara and Shiro Koshinaka Tag team match 11:23
7 Sting defeated Tony Palmore Singles match: semifinals of the "Final Countdown BVD" tournament 04:29
8 Antonio Inoki defeated Gerard Gordeau Singles match: semifinals of the "Final Countdown BVD" tournament 06:37
9 Riki Choshu and Yoshiaki Yatsu defeated Kengo Kimura and Tatsutoshi Goto Tag team match 12:32
10 Masahiro Chono and Sabu defeated Junji Hirata and Tatsumi Fujinami Tag team match 11:18
11 Hawk defeated Scott Norton Singles match 07:41
12 Antonio Inoki defeated Sting Singles match: finals of the "Final Countdown BVD" tournament 10:26
13 Hiroshi Hase and Keiji Mutoh (c) defeated The Steiner Brothers (Rick Steiner and Scott Steiner) Tag team match for the IWGP Tag Team Championship 25:12
14 Shinya Hashimoto (c) defeated Kensuke Sasaki Singles match for the IWGP Heavyweight Championship 19:36
  • (c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match
  • Videoicon – refers to the video of that match
Final Countdown BVD tournament bracket
Semifinals Finals
      
1  
 
 
 
 
 

Wrestling World 1996Edit

Wrestling World 1996
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 1996[5]
Attendance 54,000[5]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Battle 7 Wrestling World 1996 Wrestling World 1997

Wrestling World 1996 was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that traditionally takes place on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome. Wrestling World 1996 was the fifth January 4 Tokyo Dome Show held by NJPW. The show drew 54,000 spectators and $5,400,000 in ticket sales.[5] The driving storyline behind the show was an "inter-promotional" rivalry between NJPW and Union of Wrestling Forces International (UWFi) which faced off in a series of three matches. Hiroshi Hase's retirement match against his former tag team partner Kensuke Sasaki was also part of the elaborate card. The main event of the show was IWGP Heavyweight Champion Keiji Mutoh losing the championship to UWFi representative Nobuhiko Takada. The undercard featured an additional title change as Jushin Thunder Liger defeated Koji Kanemoto to win the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship. In total the show consisted of 10 matches.

Match results
# Results Stipulations Times
1 Shinjiro Otani, Tokimitsu Ishizawa and Yuji Nagata defeated Hiromitsu Kanehara, Kazushi Sakuraba and Kenichi Yamamoto Six-man tag team match: NJPW (1) vs. UWFi (0) 10:15
2 Hiroyoshi Tenzan defeated Satoshi Kojima Singles match 09:24
3 Jushin Thunder Liger defeated Koji Kanemoto (c) Singles match for the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship 18:59
4 Shiro Koshinaka defeated Masahiro Chono Singles match 09:49
5 Hiromichi Fuyuki defeated Yoji Anjo Singles match 06:42
6 Kensuke Sasaki defeated Hiroshi Hase Singles match 16:36
7 Antonio Inoki defeated Big Van Vader Singles match 14:16
8 Riki Choshu defeated Masahito Kakihara Singles match: NJPW (2) vs. UWFi (0) 05:46
9 Shinya Hashimoto defeated Kazuo Yamazaki Singles match 09:18
10 Nobuhiko Takada defeated Keiji Mutoh (c) Singles match for the IWGP Heavyweight Championship: NJPW (2) vs. UWFi (1) 17:51
  • (c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match
  • Videoicon – refers to the video of that match

Wrestling World 1997Edit

Wrestling World 1997
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 1997[6]
Attendance 62,500[6]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Wrestling World 1996 Wrestling World 1997 Final Power Hall in Tokyo Dome

Wrestling World 1997 was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that takes place on January 4 each year in the Tokyo Dome. The show drew 62,500 spectators and $5,000,000 in ticket sales.[6] The show featured 12 matches, including four matches that were promoted jointly with the Big Japan Pro Wrestling promotion and presented as a rivalry between the two promotions. The show featured 12 matches in total, including three title matches, two of which saw new champions crowned.

The first match of the show was na eight-man tag team match which on one side featured Junji Hirata, Satoshi Kojima, Manabu Nakanishi and Osamu Nishimura going against Takashi Iizuka, Osamu Kido, Yuji Nagata and Kazuo Yamazaki. The contest lasted for 11:21 before Junji Hirata pinned Yuji Nagata after striking him with a lariat.[6][7] This was the last match Nagata wrestled in Japan before travelling to the United States to work for World Championship Wrestling (WCW) as part of an "educational tour" that a lot of young Japanese wrestlers undertake to learn various styles of wrestling.[6]

The second match of the night featured the debut of a character called "Super Liger", a silver and white version of Jushin Thunder Liger played by Chris Jericho. Super Liger wrestled Koji Kanemoto in what Power Slam Magazine correspondent Rob Butcher called "A super aerial battle". Super Liger won after 11 minutes and 11 seconds of action by using a bridging tiger suplex to pin Kanemoto.[6][7] NJPW intended to use "Super Liger" character as a storyline enemy of Jushin Thunder Liger, hoping to create a rivalry similar to the Tiger Mask vs. Black Tiger rivalry.[6] However, the character was so poorly received that it was never used again.[8]

In the third match freelancer Jinsei Shinzaki defeated longtime NJPW midcarder Michiyoshi Ohara after using the Nenbutsu powerbomb.[6][7]

Matches four, five, six and seven featured a "New Japan Pro Wrestling vs. Big Japan Pro Wrestling" (BJW) premise as wrestlers representing the two companies wrestled against each other. In previous years NJPW had great success promoting "inter-promotional rivalries" against UWF International, only this time they were working with the much smaller BJW.[6] In the first match Shinjiro Otani defeated Yoshihiro Tajiri after a flying heel kick in what was described as the best contest of the NJPW vs. BJW series.[6] Kendo Nagasaki defeated Tatsutoshi Goto to even the score to 1–1.[6][7] NJPW headliner Masahiro Chono made very short work of BJW wrestler Shoji Nakamaki, defeating him with a Yakuza kick in just over a minute.[6][7] The final match of the series saw NJPW veteran Masa Saito defeat BJW president Shinya Kojika, who wrestled under the ring name The Great Kojika, to win the series 3 to 1.[6][7]

Match number eight was billed as a Mixed Martial Arts match although it was still as predetermined as all the other matches of the night. NJPW founder Antonio Inoki took on Martial Artis Willie Williams in a rematch from a highly publicized match from 1980. In the end Inoki forced Williams to submit to a ground cobra twist after 4:19.[6][7]

The ninth match of the evening was originally supposed be for nine championships in total, but at the last minute WCW had not allowed Último Dragón to put the WCW World Cruiserweight Championship on the line in the match, Dragón still defended the J-Crown Championship, a championship consisting of eight unified titles. His opponent of the night was Jushin Thunder Liger, the driving force behind NJPW's very successful Light Heavyweight division and multiple time IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship holder, a belt that at the time was part of the J-Crown.[6] Liger and Dragón had previously wrestled at the 1993 January 4 Tokyo Dome show called Fantastic Story in Tokyo Dome.[2] After over 18 minutes of high flying wrestling Liger pinned Dragón following a Steiner Screwdriver to become the fourth J-Crown holder.[6][7]

The storyline going into the tenth match of the evening was that of the first ever holders of the IWGP Tag Team Championship wanted "one last chance at the title that made them famous" before retirement. Fujinami and Kimura took on Hiroyoshi Tenzan and Masahiro Chono (who had already wrestled that night, albeit in a very short match) for the IWGP Tag Team Championship. While the age of the challengers prevented the match from being a good wrestling match the antics of Tenzan and Chono and the emotion of the challengers "last stand" created a match the crowd in the Tokyo Dome enjoyed.[6] The end came after Tenzan accidentally hit his partner, allowing Fujinami to apply a dragon sleeper on Chono to force him to submit.[6][7] With this victory Fujinami and Kimura became four-time tag team champions and the 29th overall champions.[6]

The semi-main event of the evening was billed as a "battle of the alter egos" as Keiji Mutoh reverted to his "Great Muta" character and Kensuke Sasaki wrestled as "Power Warrior". While Mutoh and Sasaki tended to wrestle a more scientific style their face painted alter egos tended to brawl more. The match quickly turned into more of a brawl than a wrestling match with both participants using the ringside tables and a steel chair during the match. Power Warrior won after moving out of the way of a Moonsault from Muta allowing him to drive Muta into a table with his Northern Lights bomb for the victory.[6][7]

The main event of the show featured the same "last stand" storyline that was used in the tag team title match as NJPW veteran Riki Choshu challenged Shinya Hashimoto for the IWGP Heavyweight Championship. In August, 1996 Choshu had surprisingly defeated Hashimoto during the 1996 G1 Climax tournament. Unlike their encounter in 1996 and unlike the tag team championship match the "legend" did not prevail in this match as Hashimoto pinned Choshu after a brainbuster following 18:04 of wrestling.

Match results
# Results[6] Stipulations Times
1 Junji Hirata, Manabu Nakanishi, Osamu Nishimura and Satoshi Kojima defeated Kazuo Yamazaki, Osamu Kido, Takayuki Iizuka and Yuji Nagata Eight-man tag team match 11:21
2 Super Liger defeated Koji Kanemoto Singles match 11:11
3 Jinsei Shinzaki defeated Michiyoshi Ohara Singles match 09:17
4 Shinjiro Otani defeated Yoshihiro Tajiri Singles match: NJPW (1) vs. BJW (0) 08:30
5 Kendo Nagasaki defeated Tatsutoshi Goto Singles match: NJPW (1) vs. BJW (1) 09:23
6 Masahiro Chono defeated Shoji Nakamaki Singles match: NJPW (2) vs. BJW (1) 01:07
7 Masa Saito defeated Shinya Kojika Singles match: NJPW (3) vs. BJW (1) 04:25
8 Antonio Inoki defeated Willie Williams Mixed martial arts match 04:19
9 Jushin Thunder Liger defeated Último Dragón (c) Singles match for the J-Crown Championship 18:21
10 Kengo Kimura and Tatsumi Fujinami defeated Cho-Ten (Hiroyoshi Tenzan and Masahiro Chono) (c) Tag team match for the IWGP Tag Team Championship 16:10
11 Power Warrior defeated The Great Muta Singles match 16:09
12 Shinya Hashimoto (c) defeated Riki Choshu Singles match for the IWGP Heavyweight Championship 18:04
  • (c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match
  • Videoicon – refers to the video of that match

Final Power Hall in Tokyo DomeEdit

Final Power Hall in Tokyo Dome
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 1998[9]
Attendance 55,000[9]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Wrestling World 1997 Final Power Hall in Tokyo Dome Wrestling World 1999

Final Power Hall in Tokyo Dome was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that takes place on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome each year. Final Power Hall in Tokyo Dome was the seventh January 4 Tokyo Dome Show held by NJPW. The show drew 62,500 spectators and $6,000,000 in ticket sales.[9] One of the focal points of the show was the retirement of wrestling legend Riki Choshu, who would wrestle five times that night against select opponents in what was billed as the Riki Road Final Message 5, the completion of month-long "retirement tour" for Choshu. The show also featured successful defenses of the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship and the IWGP Heavyweight Championship, which made Final Power Hall in Tokyo Dome the first January 4 Tokyo Dome show to not have a single championship change hands. Besides the five Riki Road Final Message 5 matches the show featured eight additional matches.

Match results
# Results Stipulations Times
1 Kendo Kashin defeated Koji Kanemoto Singles match 12:01
2 Shinjiro Otani (c) defeated Último Dragón Singles match for the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship 17:06
3 Yuji Nagata defeated Hiroyoshi Tenzan Singles match 11:33
4 Osamu Nishimura and Tatsumi Fujinami defeated Manabu Nakanishi and Satoshi Kojima Tag team match 12:39
5 Riki Choshu defeated Kazuyuki Fujita Singles match: Riki Road Final Message 5 03:57
6 Riki Choshu defeated Yutaka Yoshie Singles match: Riki Road Final Message 5 01:42
7 Riki Choshu defeated Tatsuhito Takaiwa Singles match: Riki Road Final Message 5 01:21
8 Takashi Iizuka defeated Riki Choshu Singles match: Riki Road Final Message 5 02:02
9 Riki Choshu defeated Jushin Thunder Liger Singles match: Riki Road Final Message 5 05:09
10 Don Frye defeated Naoya Ogawa via referee stoppage Singles match 08:47
11 Shinya Hashimoto defeated Dennis Lane via referee stoppage Singles match 01:34
12 Masahiro Chono defeated Shiro Koshinaka Singles match 15:05
13 Kensuke Sasaki (c) defeated Keiji Mutoh Singles match for the IWGP Heavyweight Championship 25:18
  • (c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match
  • Videoicon – refers to the video of that match

Wrestling World 1999Edit

Wrestling World 1999
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 1999[10]
Attendance 52,500[10]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Final Power Hall in Tokyo Dome Wrestling World 1999 Wrestling World 2000

Wrestling World 1999 was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that takes place on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome each year. Wrestling World 1999 was the eight January 4 Tokyo Dome Show held by NJPW. The show drew 52,500 spectators and $5,300,000 in ticket sales.[10] The show featured 10 matches in total including four championship matches, three of which saw the championship change hands.

Match results
# Results Stipulations Times
1 Manabu Nakanishi defeated Kazuyuki Fujita Singles match 11:10
2 Osamu Kido, Tadao Yasuda and Tatsumi Fujinami defeated Kengo Kimura, Michiyoshi Ohara and Tatsutoshi Goto Six-man tag team match 09:17
3 Dr. Wagner Jr. and Kendo Kashin defeated Shinjiro Otani and Tatsuhito Takaiwa (c) Tag team match for the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Tag Team Championship 16:53
4 Jushin Thunder Liger (c) defeated Koji Kanemoto Singles match for the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship 23:11
5 Kensuke Sasaki defeated Atsushi Onita by disqualification Singles match 05:55
6 Yuji Nagata defeated David Beneteau Singles match 05:30
7 Don Frye defeated Brian Johnston via referee stoppage Singles match 07:55
8 Shinya Hashimoto wrestled Naoya Ogawa to a no contest Singles match 06:58
9 Tencozy (Hiroyoshi Tenzan and Satoshi Kojima) defeated Genichiro Tenryu and Shiro Koshinaka (c) Tag team match for the IWGP Tag Team Championship 16:35
10 Keiji Mutoh defeated Scott Norton (c) Singles match for the IWGP Heavyweight Championship 19:01
  • (c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match
  • Videoicon – refers to the video of that match

Wrestling World 2000Edit

Wrestling World 2000
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 2000[11]
Attendance 53,500[11]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Wrestling World 1999 Wrestling World 2000 Wrestling World 2001

Wrestling World 2000 was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that takes place on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome each year. Wrestling World 2000 was the ninth January 4 Tokyo Dome Show held by NJPW. The show drew 53,500 spectators and $5,900,000 in ticket sales.[11] The event saw the return of World Championship Wrestling's Chris Benoit under the ring name Wild Pegasus, reprising the character he played for NJPW in the early to mid-1990s. The show also featured Rick Steiner and Randy Savage, both working as freelancers brought in specifically for the show. The twelve match card saw a successful defense of the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Tag Team Championship and the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship as well as Kensuke Sasaki defeating Genichiro Tenryu to win the IWGP Heavyweight Championship. The undercard featured a match between Masahiro Chono defeated Keiji Mutoh bearing a stipulation that the losing wrestler's faction would have to disband. Chono represented Team 2000, while Mutoh represented nWo Japan. Through Mutoh's loss nWo Japan ceased to be. It also featured the retirement match of Kazuo Yamazaki, as he wrestled his student, Yuji Nagata.

Match results
# Results Stipulations Times
1 Shinjiro Otani and Tatsuhito Takaiwa (c) defeated Kendo Kashin and Minoru Tanaka Tag team match for the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Tag Team Championship 13:19
2 Shiro Koshinaka defeated Satoshi Kojima Singles match 10:17
3 Hiroyoshi Tenzan defeated Wild Pegasus Singles match 10:55
4 Jushin Thunder Liger (c) defeated Koji Kanemoto Singles match for the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship 03:56
5 Manabu Nakanishi defeated Kenzo Suzuki Singles match 06:41
6 Yuji Nagata defeated Kazuo Yamazaki Singles match 06:44
7 Kimo defeated Kazuyuki Fujita by disqualification Singles match 04:02
8 Scott Norton defeated Don Frye Singles match 08:50
9 Rick Steiner defeated Randy Savage Singles match 11:08
10 Shinya Hashimoto and Takashi Iizuka defeated Kazunari Murakami and Naoya Ogawa Tag team match 11:29
11 Masahiro Chono defeated Keiji Mutoh Singles match, if Mutoh loses nWo Japan is forced to disband 25:00
12 Kensuke Sasaki defeated Genichiro Tenryu (c) Singles match for the IWGP Heavyweight Championship 14:43
  • (c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match
  • Videoicon – refers to the video of that match

Wrestling World 2001Edit

Wrestling World 2001
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 2001[12]
Attendance 52,000[12]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Wrestling World 2000 Wrestling World 2001 Wrestling World 2002

Wrestling World 2001 was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that takes place on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome each year. Wrestling World 2001 was the tenth January 4 Tokyo Dome Show held by NJPW. The show drew 52,000 spectators.[12] The focal point of Wrestling World 2001 was a tournament to crown a new IWGP Heavyweight Champion, which accounted for five of the nine matches on the show. No other championships were defended in 2001, marking the first year that only one title was on the line. The show saw Toshiaki Kawada wrestle twice; Kawada had previously been one of the main event wrestlers of NJPW's biggest rival All Japan Pro Wrestling.

Match results
# Results Stipulations Times
1 Kensuke Sasaki defeated Satoshi Kojima Singles match: IWGP Heavyweight Championship tournament quarter-final 16:33
2 Hiroyoshi Tenzan defeated Yuji Nagata Singles match: IWGP Heavyweight Championship tournament quarter-final 16:45
3 Koji Kanemoto and Minoru Tanaka defeated Shinya Makabe and Tatsuhito Takaiwa Tag team match 18:02
4 Takashi Iizuka defeated Kendo Kashin Singles match 06:12
5 Kensuke Sasaki defeated Masahiro Chono Singles match: IWGP Heavyweight Championship tournament semi-final 11:28
6 Toshiaki Kawada defeated Hiroyoshi Tenzan Singles match: IWGP Heavyweight Championship tournament semi-final 10:45
7 Keiji Mutoh and Shinjiro Otani defeated Jushin Thunder Liger and Manabu Nakanishi Tag team match 05:44
8 Riki Choshu wrestled Shinya Hashimoto to a no contest Singles match 15:20
9 Kensuke Sasaki defeated Toshiaki Kawada Singles match: IWGP Heavyweight Championship tournament final 10:30
  • (c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match
  • Videoicon – refers to the video of that match
IWGP Heavyweight Championship tournament bracket
  Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
                     
   Satoshi Kojima Sub
 Kensuke Sasaki 16:33  
   Kensuke Sasaki Sub  
     Masahiro Chono 11:28  
 
     
     Kensuke Sasaki Pin
   Toshiaki Kawada 10:30
   Yuji Nagata Pin  
 Hiroyoshi Tenzan 16:45  
 Hiroyoshi Tenzan Pin
     Toshiaki Kawada 10:45  
 

Wrestling World 2002Edit

Wrestling World 2002
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 2002[13]
Attendance 52,000[13]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Wrestling World 2001 Wrestling World 2002 Wrestling World 2003

Wrestling World 2002 was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that takes place on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome each year. Wrestling World 2002 was the eleventh January 4 Tokyo Dome Show held by NJPW. The show drew 52,000 spectators.[13] The show was the first January 4 Tokyo Dome Show to feature wrestlers from Pro Wrestling Noah, with the main event of the nine match show being a successful defense of the GHC Heavyweight Championship as champion Jun Akiyama defeated NJPW representative Yuji Nagata. The show also featured a successful IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship defense by Kendo Kashin.

Match results
# Results Stipulations Times
1 Masahito Kakihara and Masayuki Naruse defeated Katsuyori Shibata and Wataru Inoue Tag team match 10:50
2 El Samurai and Minoru Tanaka defeated Akira and Koji Kanemoto Tag team match 12:31
3 Kazunari Murakami and Yuki Ishikawa defeated Hiroshi Tanahashi and Kenzo Suzuki Tag team match 08:00
4 The Great Sasuke, Jushin Thunder Liger and Tiger Mask defeated Dick Togo, Gedo and Jado Six-man tag team match 20:12
5 Manabu Nakanishi defeated Giant Silva via countout Singles match 06:49
6 Kendo Kashin (c) defeated Daijiro Matsui Singles match for the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship 05:43
7 Hiroshi Hase and Keiji Mutoh defeated Osamu Nishimura and Tatsumi Fujinami Tag team match 16:44
8 Naoya Ogawa wrestled Kensuke Sasaki to a no contest Singles match 04:02
9 Tencozy (Hiroyoshi Tenzan and Satoshi Kojima) defeated Giant Singh and Masahiro Chono Tag team match 10:47
10 Jun Akiyama (c) defeated Yuji Nagata Singles match for the GHC Heavyweight Championship 19:58
  • (c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match
  • Videoicon – refers to the video of that match

Wrestling World 2003Edit

Wrestling World 2003
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 2003[14]
Attendance 30,000[14]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Wrestling World 2002 Wrestling World 2003 Wrestling World 2004

Wrestling World 2003 was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that takes place on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome each year. Wrestling World 2003 was the twelfth January 4 Tokyo Dome Show held by NJPW. The show drew 30,000 spectators.[14] The show featured the semi-finals and the finals of the "Young Generation Cup", an NJPW tournament for relative newcomers who have yet to establish themselves as top level wrestlers, which saw Ryushi Yanagisawa defeat Yutaka Yoshie to win the cup. The show featured a total of eleven matches, including a match for the vacant NWF Heavyweight Championship that Yoshihiro Takayama won by defeating Tsuyoshi Kosaka. The main event was a successful defense of the IWGP Heavyweight Championship as champion Yuji Nagata defeated Josh Barnett.

Match results
# Results Stipulations Times
1 Osamu Nishimura defeated Tatsumi Fujinami Singles match 08:10
2 Yutaka Yoshie defeated Shinya Makabe Singles match: semifinal of the Young Generation Cup 13:20
3 Ryushi Yanagisawa defeated Kenzo Suzuki Singles match: semifinal of the Young Generation Cup 09:23
4 Dai Majin and Makai #1 defeated Hiro Saito and Tatsutoshi Goto via disqualification Tag team match 07:50
5 Makai #4 and Makai #5 defeated Masahito Kakihara and Takashi Iizuka Tag team match 10:54
6 Jushin Thunder Liger, Koji Kanemoto and Takehiro Murahama defeated Heat, Masayuki Naruse and Tiger Mask Six-man tag team match 16:10
7 Ryushi Yanagisawa defeated Yutaka Yoshie Singles match: Finals of the Young Generation Cup 06:48
8 Michiyoshi Ohara and Shinsuke Nakamura defeated Kazunari Murakami and Tadao Yasuda via referee stoppage Tag team match 07:12
9 Satoshi Kojima and Hiroyoshi Tenzan defeated Masahiro Chono and Manabu Nakanishi Tag team match 23:18
10 Yoshihiro Takayama defeated Tsuyoshi Kosaka Singles match for the vacant NWF Heavyweight Championship 10:19
11 Yuji Nagata (c) defeated Josh Barnett Singles match for the IWGP Heavyweight Championship 10:40
  • (c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match
  • Videoicon – refers to the video of that match
Young Generation Cup tournament bracket
Semifinals Finals
      
 
 
 
 
 
 

Wrestling World 2004Edit

Wrestling World 2004
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 2004[15]
Attendance 40,000[15]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Wrestling World 2003 Wrestling World 2004 Toukon Festival: Wrestling World 2005

Wrestling World 2004 was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that takes place on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome each year. Wrestling World 2004 was the thirteenth January 4 Tokyo Dome Show held by NJPW. The show drew 40,000 spectators.[15] Main event of the 15 match show was a unification match between IWGP Heavyweight Champion Shinsuke Nakamura and NWF Heavyweight Champion Yoshihiro Takayama. Nakamura won the match, retiring the NWF Championship after only being active for one year. The undercard saw NJPW mainstay Jushin Thunder Liger defeat Pro Wrestling Noah's Takashi Sugiura to win the GHC Junior Heavyweight Championship, marking the first time a Noah championship changed hands at a January 4 Tokyo Dome Show. Additionally Gedo and Jado successfully defended the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Tag Team Championship against Heat and Tiger Mask and Hiroshi Tanahashi retained the IWGP U-30 Openweight Championship against Yutaka Yoshie.

Match results
# Results Stipulations Times
1 Hirooki Goto defeated Naofumi Yamamoto Singles match 06:21
2 Katsushi Takemura defeated El Samurai Singles match 06:53
3 Makai #1, Mitsuya Nagai, Ryota Chikuzen and Ryushi Yanagisawa defeated Enson Inoue, Hiro Saito, Michiyoshi Ohara and Tatsutoshi Goto Eight-man tag team match 11:55
4 Shinya Makabe and Toru Yano defeated Blue Wolf and Wataru Inoue Tag team match 10:18
5 Masayuki Naruse defeated Tadao Yasuda via disqualification (2:09), match restarted: Naruse won via stoppage Singles match 02:30
6 Ryusuke Taguchi defeated Akiya Anzawa Singles match 04:53
7 Gedo and Jado (c) defeated Heat and Tiger Mask Tag team match for the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Tag Team Championship 17:15
8 Jushin Thunder Liger defeated Takashi Sugiura (c) Singles match for the GHC Junior Heavyweight Championship 17:52
9 Hiroshi Tanahashi (c) defeated Yutaka Yoshie Singles match for the IWGP U-30 Openweight Championship 17:06
10 Josh Barnett and Takashi Iizuka defeated Katsuyori Shibata and Kazunari Murakami Tag team match 16:04
11 Osamu Nishimura defeated Minoru Suzuki Singles match 09:39
12 Manabu Nakanishi defeated Genichiro Tenryu Singles match 10:20
13 Yuji Nagata defeated Kensuke Sasaki via referee stoppage Singles match 12:10
14 Bob Sapp and Keiji Mutoh defeated Cho-Ten (Hiroyoshi Tenzan and Masahiro Chono) Tag team match 21:00
15 Shinsuke Nakamura (c) defeated Yoshihiro Takayama (c) Singles match for both the IWGP Heavyweight Championship (Nakamura) and the NWF Heavyweight Championship. The NWF title was unified with the IWGP title. As a result, the NWF title was retired. 13:55
  • (c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match
  • Videoicon – refers to the video of that match

Toukon Festival: Wrestling World 2005Edit

Toukon Festival: Wrestling World 2005
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 2005[16]
Attendance 46,000[16]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Wrestling World 2004 Toukon Festival: Wrestling World 2005 Toukon Shidou Chapter 1

Toukon Festival: Wrestling World 2005 was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that takes place on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome each year. Toukon Festival: Wrestling World 2005 was the fourteenth January 4 Tokyo Dome Show held by NJPW. The show drew 46,000 spectators.[16] The undercard of the show featured an eight-man "submissions only" tournament which Ron Waterman won when he forced Yuji Nagata to submit in the finals. The show also saw Tiger Mask defeat Heat to win the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship and in the main event Shinsuke Nakamura defeated Hiroshi Tanahashi to win the IWGP U-30 Openweight Championship. The show also featured a unique "Dog Fight" match between Masahiro Chono, Riki Choshu and Hiroyoshi Tenzan. Chono defeated Chosu in the first match and as a result had to wrestle Tenzan in the next match.

Match results
# Results Stipulations Times
1 Gedo and Jado vs. Wataru Inoue and Katsushi Takemura ended in a time limit draw Tag team match 15:00
2 Jushin Thunder Liger defeated Koji Kanemoto Singles match to determine the number one contender to the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship 10:30
3 Tiger Mask defeated Heat (c) Singles match for the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship 14:17
4 Yuji Nagata defeated Katsuhiko Nagata 15 points to 11 points Amateur wrestling-style exhibition match 05:00
5 Minoru Suzuki defeated Takashi Iizuka Singles match 09:45
6 Satoshi Kojima defeated Osamu Nishimura Singles match 19:26
7 Ron Waterman defeated Masayuki Naruse, Manabu Nakanishi, Toru Yano, Dolgorsürengiin Sumyaabazar, Mitsuya Nagai, Yuji Nagata and Blue Wolf Eight-man Ultimate Royal match 22:55
8 Ron Waterman defeated Masayuki Naruse via referee stoppage Singles match: tournament quarter-final match 02:35
9 Manabu Nakanishi defeated Toru Yano Singles match: tournament quarter-final match 03:09
10 Dolgorsürengiin Sumyaabazar defeated Mitsuya Nagai Singles match: tournament quarter-final match 05:46
11 Yuji Nagata defeated Blue Wolf Singles match: tournament quarter-final match 05:49
12 Ron Waterman defeated Manabu Nakanishi Singles match: tournament semi-final match 01:02
13 Yuji Nagata defeated Dolgorsürengiin Sumyaabazar via referee stoppage Singles match: tournament semi-final match 01:53
14 Ron Waterman defeated Yuji Nagata Singles match: tournament final match 01:41
15 Masahiro Chono defeated Riki Choshu and Hiroyoshi Tenzan "Dog Fight" rules match
16 Shinsuke Nakamura defeated Hiroshi Tanahashi (c) Singles match for the IWGP U-30 Openweight Championship 24:45
  • (c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match
  • Videoicon – refers to the video of that match
Tournament bracket
  Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
                           
   Masayuki Naruse TKO  
 Ron Waterman 02:35  
   Ron Waterman Sub  
   Manabu Nakanishi 01:02  
 Manabu Nakanishi Sub
   Toru Yano 03:09  
     Ron Waterman Sub
   Yuji Nagata 01:41
   Mitsuya Nagai Sub  
 D. Sumyaabazar 05:46  
   D. Sumyaabazar TKO
   Yuji Nagata 01:53  
 Blue Wolf Sub
   Yuji Nagata 05:49  


Toukon Shidou Chapter 1Edit

Toukon Shidou Chapter 1
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro Wrestling
Date January 4, 2006[17]
Attendance 31,000[17]
Venue Tokyo Dome
City Tokyo, Japan
Event chronology

Toukon Festival: Wrestling World 2005 Toukon Shidou Chapter 1 Wrestle Kingdom in Tokyo Dome

Toukon Shidou Chapter 1 was the title of New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW)'s annual start of the year show that takes place on January 4 in the Tokyo Dome each year. Toukon Shidou Chapter 1 was the fifteenth January 4 Tokyo Dome Show held by NJPW. The show drew 31,000 spectators.[17] The main focus of the 11 match show was the IWGP championship defenses in the semi-main event and the main event. In the semi-main event Masahiro Chono and Hiroyoshi Tenzan successfully defended the IWGP Tag Team Championship against Shiro Koshinaka and Takao Omori; while the main event featured Brock Lesnar retaining the IWGP Heavyweight Championship against Shinsuke Nakamura. For only the second time in the history of the January 4 Tokyo Dome Shows no title changed hands.

Match results
# Results Stipulations Times
1 Ryouji Sai defeated Naofumi Yamamoto Singles match 08:18
2 Badboy Hido, Kintaro Kanemura and Masato Tanaka defeated Gedo, Jado and Jushin Thunder Liger Six-man tag team match 10:03
3 Minoru and Tiger Mask defeated Tatsuhito Takaiwa and Tomohiro Ishii Tag team match 12:11
4 Daisuke Sekimoto, KAMIKAZE, Kohei Sato, Riki Choshu, Takashi Uwano and Yoshihito Sasaki defeated Hirooki Goto, Hiroshi Nagao, Osamu Nishimura, Takashi Iizuka, Tatsumi Fujinami and Toru Yano Twelve-man tag team match 12:16
5 Akebono and Yutaka Yoshie defeated Black Strong Machine and Hiro Saito Tag team match 09:18
6 Yuji Nagata defeated Kazunari Murakami Singles match 13:11
7 Shinjiro Otani defeated Koji Kanemoto Singles match 10:47
8 Katsuyori Shibata defeated Hiroshi Tanahashi Singles match 11:59
9 Giant Bernard defeated Manabu Nakanishi Singles match 09:53
10 Masahiro Chono and Hiroyoshi Tenzan (c) defeated Shiro Koshinaka and Takao Omori Tag team match for the IWGP Tag Team Championship 19:28
11 Brock Lesnar (c) defeated Shinsuke Nakamura Singles match for the IWGP Heavyweight Championship 08:58
  • (c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match
  • Videoicon – refers to the video of that match

Wrestle Kingdom in Tokyo DomeEdit

Wrestle Kingdom II in Tokyo DomeEdit

Wrestle Kingdom III in Tokyo DomeEdit

Wrestle Kingdom IV in Tokyo DomeEdit

Wrestle Kingdom V in Tokyo DomeEdit

Wrestle Kingdom VI in Tokyo DomeEdit

Wrestle Kingdom 7 in Tokyo DomeEdit

Wrestle Kingdom 8 in Tokyo DomeEdit

Wrestle Kingdom 9 in Tokyo DomeEdit

Wrestle Kingdom 10 in Tokyo DomeEdit

Wrestle Kingdom 11 in Tokyo DomeEdit

Wrestle Kingdom 12 in Tokyo DomeEdit

Wrestle Kingdom 12 in Tokyo Dome is scheduled to take place on January 4, 2018.[18]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "Super Warriors in Tokyo Dome". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 1992. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#92. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 "Fantastic Story". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 1993. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#93. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Battlefield". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 1994. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#94. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 "Battle Seven". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 1995. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#95a. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 "Wrestling War in Tokyo Dome 1996". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 1996. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#96a. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  6. 6.00 6.01 6.02 6.03 6.04 6.05 6.06 6.07 6.08 6.09 6.10 6.11 6.12 6.13 6.14 6.15 6.16 6.17 6.18 6.19 6.20 Butcher, Rob (March 1997). "The Money Factory". Power Slam Magazine. Lancaster, Lancashire, England: SW Publishing LTD. pp. 26–27. 32. 
  7. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named Jan4-97
  8. Jericho, Chris. A Lion's Tale: Around the World in Spandex. Grand Central Publishing. 
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 "Power Hall in Tokyo Dome". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 1998. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#98a. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 "Wrestling World 1999". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 1999. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#99. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 "Wrestling World 2000". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 2000. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#0100. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 "Wrestling World 2001". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 2001. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#2001. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 "Wrestling World 2002". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 2002. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#0102. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 "Wrestling World 2003". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 2003. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#0103. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 "Wrestling World 2004". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 2004. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#0104. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 "Wrestling World 2005". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 2005. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#0105. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 "Toukon Shidou Chapter 1". ProWrestlingHistory.com. January 4, 2006. http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/tokyodome.html#2006. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  18. "ローソンチケット Presents G1 Climax 27" (in Japanese). New Japan Pro-Wrestling. http://www.njpw.co.jp/tornament/92085?showResult=1. Retrieved August 13, 2017.


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Current Wrestle Kingdom in Tokyo Dome · II in Tokyo Dome · III in Tokyo Dome · IV in Tokyo Dome · V in Tokyo Dome · VI in Tokyo Dome · 7 in Tokyo Dome · 8 in Tokyo Dome · 9 in Tokyo Dome · 10 in Tokyo Dome · 11 in Tokyo Dome
Fantastica Mania 2011 · 2012 · 2013 · 2014 · 2015 · 2016 · 2017
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Dominion 6.20 · 6.19 · 6.18 · 6.16 · 6.22 · 6.21 · 7.5 in Osaka-jo Hall · 6.19 in Osaka-jo Hall · 6.11 in Osaka-jo Hall
Destruction 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010 · 2011 · 2012 · 2013 · Kobe 2014 · Okayama 2014 · Okayama 2015 · Kobe 2015 · Tokyo · Hiroshima · Kobe 2016 · Fukushima · Hiroshima 2017 · Kobe 2017
King of Pro-Wrestling 2012 · 2013 · 2014 · 2015 · 2016 · 2017
Power Struggle 2011 · 2012 · 2013 · 2014 · 2015 · 2016 · 2017
Former All Together (Tokyo & Sendai) · Back to the Yokohama Arena · NEVER (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Road to the Super Jr. 2Days Tournament, 7: Go to the Next Level, 8: Go to the Next Level, 9: Road to the Super Jr. 2Days Tournament 1st., 9: Road to the Super Jr. 2Days Tournament Final, Shodai NEVER Musabetsu Kyu Oza Kettei Tournament 1st Round & Shodai NEVER Musabetsu Kyu Oza Kettei Tournament Final) · Global Wars (2014, 2015 & 2016) · G1 Special in USA · WCW/New Japan Supershow (I, II & III) · Pyongyang International Sports and Culture Festival for Peace · World Wrestling Peace Festival · Wrestling Toyonokuni · Wrestling Hinokuni (2015 & 2016)
January 4 Dome Show Super Warriors (Tokyo & Sendai) · Back to the Yokohama Arena · NEVER (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Road to the Super Jr. 2Days Tournament, 7: Go to the Next Level, 8: Go to the Next Level, 9: Road to the Super Jr. 2Days Tournament 1st., 9: Road to the Super Jr. 2Days Tournament Final, Shodai NEVER Musabetsu Kyu Oza Kettei Tournament 1st Round & Shodai NEVER Musabetsu Kyu Oza Kettei Tournament Final) · Global Wars (2014, 2015 & 2016) · G1 Special in USA · WCW/New Japan Supershow (I, II & III) · Pyongyang International Sports and Culture Festival for Peace · World Wrestling Peace Festival · Wrestling Toyonokuni · Wrestling Hinokuni (2015 & 2016)

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